1999 Testing Policy

NASCAR issues 1999 testing policy ROCKINGHAM, N.C. (Nov. 1, 1998) NASCAR officials on Sunday released a "proposed" 1999 test policy for teams in the NASCAR Winston Cup Series to team owners, drivers and crew chiefs in the drivers' and crew ...

NASCAR issues 1999 testing policy

ROCKINGHAM, N.C. (Nov. 1, 1998) NASCAR officials on Sunday released a "proposed" 1999 test policy for teams in the NASCAR Winston Cup Series to team owners, drivers and crew chiefs in the drivers' and crew chiefs' meeting prior to the ACDelco 400 at North Carolina Speedway.

While the document was presented to the teams for their review, officials said they anticipated no major changes to the policy.

The major point of the new testing guidelines is a seven-test limit that will be in effect from Jan. 3, 1999, through the end of the 1999 season. Of the seven test dates, four will be "manufacturer's tests" conducted by General Motors and Ford Motor Company for teams using their vehicles. Of these four dates, one each will be at Daytona International Speedway; Talladega Superspeedway; Indianapolis Motor Speedway; and Charlotte Motor Speedway.

Teams may elect to test at three other NASCAR Winston Cup Series facilities of their choice. In a continuation of a policy that was in effect previously, testing will not be permitted from the finish of the final race of the 1998 season until Jan. 3, 1999 at any facility on the 1998 or 1999 NASCAR Winton Cup Series schedule.

In a rule similar to that currently in place, any team with a rookie driver, registered in the NASCAR Winston Cup Rookie of the Year program, will receive 12 test sessions.

Exceptions to the NASCAR testing guidelines include tests for the Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. and those mandated by NASCAR itself.

The guidelines detailed other rules, including those by which teams would schedule and gain admission to tests, as well as penalties for failing to comply with the policy.

"As long as the rules are the same for everybody, I don't guess it's all that big of a deal either way," said Jeremy Mayfield, driver of the Penske-Kranefuss Racing Mobil 1 Ford. "This will make testing even more important, though. It makes every test you do that more important. Everything you can learn, you need to learn. Everybody is going to have to test smarter."

Mayfield's crew chief, Paul Andrews, indicated that teams would have to roll as much information over as they could from similar track to similar track.

"You're going to need to take as much advantage of each test as you can," Andrews said. "An Indianapolis test, for example, is going to be important for the race at Indianapolis, and probably the races at Pocono, too, as well as some of the other flat tracks. You'll have to be able to transfer what you learn to a number of different areas and to a number of different tracks.

"On the surface, we had seven tests this year and we'll have seven tests next year. But since you can't spread them out next year as far as you can this year, it will tighten everything up. If NASCAR was looking to make the testing difference less between single-car teams and multi-car teams, this was a step in that direction."

Teams will compete in the season finale NAPA 500 at Atlanta Motor Speedway this weekend, at which time the new testing policy will take effect.

Source: NASCAR Online

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Series Monster Energy NASCAR Cup
Drivers Jeremy Mayfield