M2: JiR interview with Mattia Pasini

Qatar Grand Prix: interview with Mattia Pasini Qatar's race was a big confidence booster both for riders and technicians in the JiR Moto2 squad. Mattia Pasini was at his competitive best, playing out a fascinating duel with Thomas Luthi and with...

Qatar Grand Prix: interview with Mattia Pasini

Qatar's race was a big confidence booster both for riders and technicians in the JiR Moto2 squad. Mattia Pasini was at his competitive best, playing out a fascinating duel with Thomas Luthi and with his team mate Simone Corsi, ending the race in 6th position.

This was excellent payback for the huge amount of work that the mechanics put in over the grand prix weekend.

Mattia, after pre-season tests that were not so positive you managed to take 6th position in the race.

Yes, in tests in Spain things went slowly and this is to be expected as everything was new for all of us. We tried several solutions each one very different from the other that took us a lot of time but gave us lots of precious information. We arrived in Qatar full of optimism and our machines responded well to the modifications made after tests, even if we had some delay to see the results on the stopwatch. I enjoyed the race, I managed to get a good start and gain immediately some positions, but I couldn't catch the six leading riders. It was a pity because my lap times were similar to theirs, but the gap was too big to be pulled back. Luthi came up very fast and we suddenly started to fight, I tried to always keep in contact, without letting him lead for more than one or two corners and at the end I succeeded and beat him to the line.

What's your impression of this new category?

Well, the engines have enough horsepower and they pull hard enough down the straight. We, in particular, found the right set-up, but we still need to work on how we get maximum speed coming out of the faster corners. The good thing is that the engines are really equal for all teams so the Championship will be hard-fought.

Where will be the difference between teams and riders?

Engines are equal of course, but there is all the development around them: electronics but most of all the frame and suspension parts. It's different to the old 250cc two-stroke class, where you had 20 years of development, meaning there was no real room for any more important changes. Here in Moto2, everything is new so there are many more opportunities for variations and improvements.

So is it a good category?

So far the class promises much. The bikes are less nervous than a 250 and can be ridden in a more relaxed style and also sliding the bike is easier, which is a way of riding I like very much. It's a very 'democratic' category, because we all share the same basis: engines and tyres. Besides this, the riders in this class are very aggressive and competitive: all I have to say is that I started 18th but only 1.2 seconds from the pole-position!

How do you think your season will go?

As I said, the signs are good for us to run among the top riders. In Qatar I lost time on the leading pack but I ran with similar lap times, which is positive. The team is also a very good team, they are all professional and extremely competent. We all need to give 110% to keep on moving forward but signs are good.

-source: jir

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About this article
Series MotoGP
Drivers Thomas Luthi , Mattia Pasini , Simone Corsi