Grand American Road Racing Car Specs

GRAND AMERICAN ROAD RACING ASSOCIATION ANNOUNCES INAUGURAL 2000 SEASON CAR RULES Daytona Beach (November 29, 1999) - The Grand American Road Racing Association (Grand-Am) today announced the rules and regulations for the various categories of...

GRAND AMERICAN ROAD RACING ASSOCIATION ANNOUNCES INAUGURAL 2000 SEASON CAR RULES

Daytona Beach (November 29, 1999) - The Grand American Road Racing Association (Grand-Am) today announced the rules and regulations for the various categories of race cars eligible to compete in Grand-Am events during the 2000 season, beginning with the prestigious 38th running of the "Rolex 24 At Daytona".

Similar in configuration and appearance to the types of sports cars that competed in Daytona in 1999, these categories include the top division SportsRacers and companion SportsRacer II cars for exotic, open-top prototypes like the Ferrari 333SP, Ford R&S, and an all new race car from Cadillac.

Sharing the racetrack with the SportsRacers in combined events like the "Rolex 24 At Daytona,” and running in separate sprint races when circumstances allow, will be the GTO, GTU and American GT divisions for production-based automobiles like Chevrolet Corvettes, Ford Mustangs, Dodge Vipers, BMW M-3’s, and Porsche 911’s.

"These rules strive to maintain a sense of continuity with the cars that have contested the Rolex in recent years, yet provide for a more level playing field," said Grand-Am President Roger Edmondson. "We have carefully examined relative performance levels of these types of racing machines, made the necessary adjustments, and look forward to a season of close competition."

SportsRacers must meet a minimum weight of 1985 lbs. A variety of engines are eligible and will be balanced using air intake restrictors to achieve performance levels in the 650 horsepower range. Underside venturis, tunnels and other so-called "ground effects" are not permitted. Full size rollover bars are mandatory. All cars must compete using steel brakes and rotors. Propriety technologies are not allowed.

SportsRacer II category cars use preparation rules almost identical to SportsRacers, however some exotic construction materials are banned. Additionally, normally aspirated, six cylinder engines up to three liters in displacement must power all SportsRacer II cars.

In both SportsRacer divisions, all cars and components must be generally available for legitimate purchase at reasonable price levels.

GTO and GTU categories feature a variety of makes and models derived from production cars. The regulations for both classes are virtually the same except for engine size and minimum weights. GTO cars feature larger displacement engines developing approximately 650 horsepower. GTO minimum weight is 2450 lbs. GTU engine performance estimates are around 450 horsepower with minimum weights ranging from 1850 lbs. to 2500 lbs., depending upon engine size.

American GT cars are popular U.S. "pony cars" such as Mustangs and Camaros, purpose-built on tube-frame chassis similar to a NASCAR Winston Cup Series cars and powered by V-8 engines producing upwards of 600 horsepower and weighing a minimum of 2550 lbs.

"From SportsRacers to our various production car categories, these 2000 rules make sense, are timely, and should be attractive to both privateers and factories," said Edmondson. "They provide a sound basis on which to build the future of this sport."

Detailed car preparation rules and regulations are available from the Grand American Road Racing Website, www.grand-am.com, or by Grand-Am’s fax-on-demand at 201-585-2855.

-GARRA-

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