DC comments on the wild show in Watkins Glen

WATKINS GLEN -- MUCH ADO Thursday and Friday's Watkins Glen action was a pretty wild show for a sportscar race event where the participants are supposed to be upper-crust types possessing a "sporting" demeanor. In the end, 17-year-old...


WATKINS GLEN -- MUCH ADO

Thursday and Friday's Watkins Glen action was a pretty wild show for a sportscar race event where the participants are supposed to be upper-crust types possessing a "sporting" demeanor.

In the end, 17-year-old driver Colin Braun still is sitting on the sidelines and another racer, Boris Said, will be co-driving the No. 76 Krohn Racing Ford-Riley in his stead.

The team is working on naming a replacement driver for the August 26 Infineon Raceway Rolex Series/IndyCar Series races, the last of 2006's three such dual events.

Mr. Braun turns 18 just about three weeks later. Celebrate? I'd bet the farm he does.

However, one can only wonder if the hassles here and at Homestead-Miami Speedway earlier in the year may preclude the organizations from coming together again in the future.

LIFE HAPPENS

For the most part, Tracy Krohn's motives were honorable but, also for the most part, those in the Grand American paddock weren't terribly thrilled with his efforts.

Some in that paddock even hinted that others -- never themselves, of course -- might be wanting to exact some measure of revenge on Krohn's No. 75 Ford-Riley, which he co-drives with Nic Jonsson, during Saturday's Six-Hours of The Glen.

"There are ways to do those things without it being too obvious," one team owner said.

The fact is Krohn erred. Even he admitted as much in the joint Grand American/Krohn Racing statement that put the adverse situation to bed Friday.

"It was never our intention to disrupt the competition, but instead to provide a mechanism for Colin Braun to be racing ..." Krohn was quoted as saying.

Though an owner's methodology might need a little tuning at various times and for various reasons, that an owner would stick up for his driver surely isn't exactly a bad thing.

CRAZY LIKE A FOX?

As a result of Thursday's legal matters, the pre-race schedule having thus been thrown out the window, Rolex Series officials decided to allot all of Friday's track time to practice, allowing teams the option of spending more practice time in an effort to acclimate its third driver -- who usually does not have a regular DP ride through the bulk of the season.

Though fielding objections from some disgruntled teams -- one particularly vociferous team owner being No. 12 Lowe's Racing's Adrian Fernandez -- the Rolex Series will nonetheless be gridded by points for the start of Saturday's classic endurance race.

It would be later Friday "daylight" practices that revealed Fernandez' hand -- one justifiably played -- when his No. 12 Lowe's Pontiac-Riley consistently ran among the top-five fastest cars on the 3.28-mile Watkins Glen "Long Course."

Instead of a prospective pole position, the Lowe's car will be gridded ninth.

Oh, and key among Fernandez' complaints?

The No. 76 Krohn Racing Ford-Riley -- having an updated driving team of Jorg Bergmeister and Boris Said -- will be starting on the outside pole for Saturday's race.

"The people who started this whole mess, causing us to miss an actual qualification period, are among those who have benefited the most from the loss of that session," Fernandez said.

Frankly, I still don't think Tracy Krohn is crazy.

-DC Williams, exclusively for Motorsports.com

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Series Grand-Am
Teams Williams , Krohn Racing