Daytona Prototypes engine rules update 2002-07-12

Daytona Prototypes Engine Rules Updated BMW, Ford, Porsche Become First Approved Engines DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. (July 11, 2002) -- Momentum continues to build on the Daytona Prototype stage as Grand American Road Racing Association announces...

Daytona Prototypes Engine Rules Updated BMW, Ford, Porsche Become First Approved Engines

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. (July 11, 2002) -- Momentum continues to build on the Daytona Prototype stage as Grand American Road Racing Association announces further details on the engine rules. The Daytona Prototypes will be the featured class in the Rolex Sports Car Series in 2003 when the series makes its season debut at the Rolex 24 At Daytona.

"The concept since day one has been to provide a platform where smaller high-revving engines can compete head-to-head against large displacement V8s," Daytona Prototypes Project Manager Mark Raffauf explained. "What we're doing now is defining the rules more clearly so car builders can choose which engine they want to use and then start preparing them for competition."

The new rules announced today offer details on specific requirements for different sized engines and are based on displacement and engine configuration.


Size, Compression, RPM, Restrictor, Transmission, Other
3.8L & under, Unlimited, 8600, None, Six-speed,
3.81L - 4.3L, 11:1, TBD, TBD, Six-speed,
Four-valve Ford 4.6L, 11:1, 7000, Use approved Ford throttle body inlet, Six-speed,
Four-valve BMW 4.997L, 11:1, 6800, 30mm, Five-speed,
Two-valve 5.0L - 5.35L, 10.5:1, TBD, TBD, Five-speed, 3.25-inch max. stroke

"Engines still have to be submitted to us for approval," Grand American Director of Competition Dave Watson added. "The difference now is that we have established some guidelines for people to use when selecting which engine to submit."

Watson added that the BMW 4.997 liter and the Porsche 3.6 liter engines have both been tested and approved at Pro Motor Engineering, the engine testing facility in Charlotte that is dynotesting all engines for approval, and that the Ford 4.6 liter engine has received tentative approval pending completion of testing.

"We are talking with three other manufacturers right now and will see some more powerplants coming to PME in the next couple of weeks," he continued. "Other companies have told us they will be participating but have not scheduled engine testing yet. By this fall, there should be at least six different engines approved for competition."

Raffauf pointed out that all of the new regulations are in keeping with the rules previously written in the Daytona Prototypes rulebook. "The only things that could even be considered new or different are the specifications on the five or six-speed gearboxes and the lack of compression limits on the small engines," he noted. "The transmission regulation is another way to help keep the playing field level. The same is true for letting the small motors rev. We want good racing from the front to the back of the field."

More information on the Daytona Prototypes and the Rolex Sports Car Series, including the Daytona Prototypes rulebook, is available online at www.grand-am.com. The rulebook will be updated early next week to reflect the new regulations.

-grand am-

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Series Grand-Am