DTC: Jyllands-Ringen extension approved

Final go-ahead given for Jyllands-Ringen extension. The new 2.5 kilometre FIA approved circuit wil open in August Less than a month after work on the brand-new Padborg Park circuit was commenced near the Danish-German border, the Danish ...

Final go-ahead given for Jyllands-Ringen extension.
The new 2.5 kilometre FIA approved circuit wil open in August

Less than a month after work on the brand-new Padborg Park circuit was commenced near the Danish-German border, the Danish Environmental Appeal Tribunal could give the final go-ahead for the planned extension of the country's leading motor racing circuit, Jyllands-Ringen, which will be extended from its present length of 1,475 metres to roughly 2,500 metres.

"Finally we can celebrate the planning permission and start work on the actual construction, something that we have been waiting for for a very long time," Peter Elgaard explains. Elgaard is the managing director of DTC A/S, which runs all motorsport events at the circuit, which is owned by the Danish motorists' union, FDM.

"This extension has been very important for all racing drivers in Denmark, but also for Danish motorsport as such, as it helps us gain a larger place on the international arena. In its present version Jyllands-Ringen is approved by FIA for international races, and the new longer circuit will also be FIA-approved. It is our very aim with the extension to attract rounds of either international series or championships from some of our neighbouring countries to the circuit."

The original Jyllands-Ringen was opened in 1966 as a very twisty circuit, but the creation of a second straight the following year saw the average speed rise substantially. In the mid-70s the ownership passed over to FDM, who in 1990 opened an oval-like circuit nearby, which has solely been used for normal driver training. But in 1996 FDM applied for planning permission to link the two circuits together to form one big circuit, and following the lengthy environmental permission process the final go-ahead was given this week.

"With the amalgamation of the two circuits Danish motor racing will be getting a really versatile circuit with lots of challenges," Peter Elgaard says. "Our present secondary straight will be extended and a couple of right handers will lead the cars from the old racing circuit onto the present training circuit, which has some wide-radius turns. The cars will then return to the old circuit just before the entry to our daunting final corner, which will be the greatest challenge on the lap, just as it has always been. With this layout the racing driver will be faced with almost every possible challenge, from fast straights to curves and corner combination of differing difficulties."

The excavators will move in as soon as possible, but even though the construction work might have been ready for the season-opening event on April 27th, the new circuit will not open until the annual Danish Grand Prix at the end of August.

"We really don't want to speed up things unnecessarily, as every details has to be done properly so that we can make sure that the new circuit is FIA-approved from day one," Elgaards points out.

The extension project is financed by three parties. Apart from circuit owner FDM, event organizer DTC A/S, the national elite sporting board, Team Danmark, will also help with funds.

-dtc/ma-

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