DC's A Skeleton Rattles

A SKELETON RATTLES When I was a kid, only the monster under my bed scared me worse than a skeleton. On the all-of-two television channels available to me in that era, the cartoons appearing upon which and those in movie theaters (which once ...


A SKELETON RATTLES

When I was a kid, only the monster under my bed scared me worse than a skeleton.

On the all-of-two television channels available to me in that era, the cartoons appearing upon which and those in movie theaters (which once ran cartoons ahead of a "feature presentation" and between a "double feature") were prone to caricaturize skeletons as spooky, rattling noisemakers, the "bones" clanging as they bumped one another.

An orthopaedic surgeon who today occasionally reminds me that "You just can't do (this or that) at your age anymore" when I come a-whimpering into his office, has in each of his examination rooms a full skeleton. The good doctor's been around so long that a couple or three of the displays are actually real bones, though some - as his practice has grown ever larger - are made of realistic-looking but less-expensive plastic.

Still, they look real enough.

During one office visit many years ago I took my two, then very young but ambulatory daughters along. One - oddly enough, the youngest - was fascinated by the skeleton in my examination room, while her older sister - just as soon as she spied the skeleton - wouldn't for any reason cross that door's threshold. We're talking "no way" - and she even later would graduate summa cum laude at her school.

Thank goodness the office staff was more than happy to entertain her as I got poked, prodded, X-rayed and was delivered one of my earliest "You Can't Anymore" lectures.

It all seems pretty silly in retrospect; being and seeing a kid who did whatever he thought necessary to keep some distance between he and what would be nothing more than a pile of bones if not for string tying one to the other.

Yet, many of us as adults came to learn that old bones could hurt - especially those found in closets.

Mauricia Grant, is a former NASCAR official who a couple of months ago started seeking $225 million (USD) in recompense from her one-time employer for "racial" and "sexual discrimination," "sexual harassment" and "wrongful termination" in the wake of her late-2007 dismissal for, according to NASCAR, "poor work performance."

On Thursday, the Associated Press reported that various official documents reveal that Grant has over the years had a number of legal tussles, including a 2002 restraining order issued against her and an apparently still-active January 2005 bench warrant seeking Grant's arrest after she violated probationary terms incurred after a DUI arrest and conviction.

Put another way: Ms. Grant had some skeletons in her closet.

And, according to sources familiar with the matter, there are a few more skeletons in Ms. Grant's closet that could yet emerge in a public forum such as a courtroom. Only these particular bones are directly related to Grant's NASCAR job performance, or lack thereof.

Now, before someone begins thinking this father of two daughters and husband of a very strong-willed spouse is of the mind that past actions make palatable any form of illegal discrimination, they're flat wrong.

Yet, whereas the NASCAR suit has yet to be adjudicated, what the Associated Press has discovered are matters of settled, legal fact and, insofar as Grant is concerned, are also known as "skeletons in the closet."

Like it or not, in reality old bones often are loosed from a glass house's closets when its occupant starts throwing stones at another.

Later.
    DC Williams, exclusively for Motorsport.com

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Series General , NASCAR
Teams Williams