US GP Montoya press conference Part III

Indianapolis Motor Speedway Juan Pablo Montoya Teleconference Transcript Aug. 17, 2001 Part III Coordinator: Thank you. Eric Powell, you may ask your question, and please state your affiliation. E. Powell: Hello. This is Eric Powell, ...

Indianapolis Motor Speedway
Juan Pablo Montoya Teleconference Transcript
Aug. 17, 2001

Part III

Coordinator: Thank you. Eric Powell, you may ask your question, and please state your affiliation.

E. Powell: Hello. This is Eric Powell, Indianapolis Motor Speedway. Juan, talk a little bit about this race in particular. Obviously, this is a big market for BMW. Is there any other pressure on you guys at all to make a big splash here in America?

J. Montoya: Not really. I think America is huge market, but I think the bigger pressure is racing in Germany. It wouldn't be, and you go to so many places.

It's another race. It's another race that you have to try to do your best. It's something. It's a place where you have got to try to fine-tune everything and try to get the best out of it.

E. Powell: Juan, tell me what kind of advantages do you guys think you'll have over other teams at this track?

J. Montoya: At Indy, I think we're going have great power in the car, and our engine is really good, so I think it is a track that is going to suit us quite well like Germany did.

E. Powell: Thank you.

Coordinator: Thank you. Daniel Levert, you may ask your question, and please state your affiliation. I'm sorry, Bob Margolis, you may ask your question and please state your affiliation.

B. Margolis: Bob Margolis with Sporting News. Juan Pablo, would you talk a little bit about the difference in the pressure in the team from the early part of the season when the pressure was to show that you had a car that could do it to now showing that you've got the car and now you've go the pressure to win every weekend?

J. Montoya: Well, you always have the pressure to win and to try to do the best you can with the car, but you know, an example is last week. I did a great week, and everything went well. Then in the middle of the race, something happened, and you know, that's racing.

Out of that, what can they say? It's a mistake that happens, and that's the way it goes with racing.

B. Margolis: In the early part of the season, there were some questions about the car and the engine combination. Now that's pretty much established. Do you feel an extra added pressure now to perform, or has it been pretty much the same?

J. Montoya: It's always the same pressure. It's not a huge pressure. You know you become part of the team and you just go out and work with everybody to get the best out of it.

B. Margolis: OK, thank you.

Coordinator: At this time, I show no further questions.

P. Kelly: Juan, this is Paul Kelly. I'll ask you a question. What do you miss most about life in America? What aspect of American life do you miss the most?

J. Montoya: I think I miss a lot of the guys in America, saying they were great guys -you know, Jimmy (Vasser), my teammate, Dario (Franchitti), Paul Tracy - all of those guys were something special, and they were just great. It was good fun.

P. Kelly: OK, Dawn. Let's open it back up for questions.

Coordinator: Curt Cavin, you may ask your question, and please state your affiliation.

C. Cavin: Yes, Indianapolis Star. Again, Juan, you look at earlier in the year, it just seems like you and Michael Schumacher had kind of a magnet to each other both personally and racing wise. Do you have discussions with him? Did you talk to him about - because he was pretty critical, I think, early, and can you talk about your relationship there with Michael?

J. Montoya: There is none, to be honest. You know, I think he is doing like everything, and I think, you know people are very reserved here, and I think the only thing I can say is as soon as they see he could be a threat, they have got to react to it.

C. Cavin: Can you talk about how your car just seems to be cursed this year? Everything that could go wrong has gone wrong.

J. Montoya: That's racing. There's nothing you can do about it. I think the team is doing the best job they can, and apart from that, you cannot do much more really.

You know, in every race we try to do our best. We try to get the best out of the car every weekend, and you know, sometimes things work better than others.

Coordinator: Paul Kaminski, you may ask your question, and please state your affiliation.

P. Kaminski: Yes, I'm with Motor Sports Radio. Juan, can you compare the road course at the Brickyard to any of the F1 circuits that you run? We know that every racing circuit is different. It has it's own personality, but are there any similarities to any place that you really run anywhere else?

J. Montoya: I really couldn't really tell you that. It's difficult because I could say maybe something like Hockenheim, but you know Hockenheim is long, straight and you don't have much gains where there's a lot of hairpin stairs. It's, you know, it's straight and it's really long, and it would be quite crucial to see what happens.

P. Kaminski: Thank you.

Coordinator: Thank you. Dick Mittman, you may ask your question, and please state your affiliation.

D. Mittman: Yes, Juan, you know at your age, and you look at Michael and 50 victories in Formula One, how amazing is that to you? Do you think that if you could get a streak going, you could be up in that category when you are in your 30s?

J. Montoya: Yes, I think you can still be in Formula One when you are in your early 30s, but, you know, I think it is very personal when you say you want to retire.

D. Mittman: What about the fact, you know, you look at him and he has 50 victories. Is that kind of amazing to you?

J. Montoya: Not really. I think he's always been in really good team, and he is a very good driver, so I think that is why he has got them, and I'm sure he's going to get a lot more before he retires.

D. Mittman: OK, thank you.

Coordinator: Dean Burdette, you may ask your question, and please state your affiliation.

D. Burdette: WPXN Radio, Paxton/Rantoul, Illinois. Juan, in the Indy cars, it seems like the driver has a lot of input into the setting up of the automobile, the race car. In Formula One, is that true with the driver? Does he have that much to say about it?

J. Montoya: Yes, I think everything goes around what the driver says and what the drivers feel.

D. Burdette: OK, thank you.

Coordinator: Thank you. Bob Margolis, you may ask your question.

B. Margolis: Juan Pablo, talk a little bit about some of your fellow rookie drivers. How do you rate them? Is Kimi Raikkonen probably the best of the other rookies out there?

J. Montoya: Well, I think Kimi has done a really good job in being in his first year and with so little experience. You never know. Enrique Bernoldi has done a good job. It's very difficult to really tell because sometimes a car doesn't really allow them to show performance.

B. Margolis: Thank you. What kind of race is going on in the background?

J. Montoya: It's a (Formula) 3000 qualifying.

B. Margolis: OK.

Coordinator: Curt Cavin, you may ask your question, and please state your affiliation.

C. Cavin: Indianapolis Star. Can you talk a little bit about the role of the test driver in Formula One? I don't think Americans quite understand what kind of drivers are in as test drivers in F1, and then what kind of role they play in the team. Do you use the information that they provide?

J. Montoya: Yes, the test driver at the moment is Marc Gene. We come marching in, and he has to be a Formula One driver. He is a guy with a lot of experience. He is a guy that can drive the car as well as we do, and you know, sometimes there are so many things to test and try with the car, that we don't really have the time to do it. Because sometimes they are given three cars to test, and we only have two drivers, so the test driver is like an extra support for the team.

C. Cavin: You would say that it's also kind of used sometimes as a stepping stone for guys, too? Did you ever think that maybe that was a way that maybe you could get to Formula One?

J. Montoya: Yes, because that was the way I started was my first connection with Williams.

C. Cavin: Yes, right.

Coordinator: At this time I show no further questions.

P. Kelly: Juan, this is Paul Kelly, and I'll ask you one question, and then we'll open it up for a couple of more and let you go. Of all of the differences in an F1 car between CART, the narrow track, the grooved tires, the addition of launch control, traction control, starting at Barcelona, what aspect of an F1 car was most difficult for you to adjust to this year?

J. Montoya: I think the car is very critical to drive, it is very unpredictable to setup changes, and the setup makes so much more difference than other cars. You know, in car, CART is responsive to setup changes, but this one is a lot more, and it's very critical, and it is quite difficult to drive.

P. Kelly: OK, Dawn, let's open it back up.

Coordinator: I'm showing no further questions.

P. Kelly: OK. Well, on that note, Juan, we'll let you get a head start to the driver's briefing, and we sure appreciate the time that you took with us, and best of luck this weekend in Budapest.

Juan I thank you very much.

P. Kelly: Thank you Juan, and that concludes our teleconference. We thank you all for joining us, and again, the SAP United States Grand Prix is September 30th, and the credential deadline for American journalists working for U.S. based publications is August 24th.

Tickets are still available at 800-822-INDY or uspgindy.com. If anyone has any questions, they can call myself or Josh Laycock at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

We appreciate your participation. Thank you.

Part II, Part II

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About this article
Series Formula 1
Drivers Juan Pablo Montoya
Teams Williams