Mosley has had enough

FIA President Max Mosley made no bones about his reasons for announcing he will resign; he's simply had enough. Mosley surprised the F1 fraternity this week when he informed the F1 Commission he will step down as President of the FIA in October...

FIA President Max Mosley made no bones about his reasons for announcing he will resign; he's simply had enough. Mosley surprised the F1 fraternity this week when he informed the F1 Commission he will step down as President of the FIA in October this year. His term was not due to end until 2005 but he doesn't want to stay for another 'mundane' year.

"I've got to the point now where I no longer find it interesting or satisfying to sit in long meetings, particularly with the Formula One teams and the World Rally Championship teams," Mosley said at a press conference in Magny Cours today, July 2nd.

"People often agree things and then they go away after the meeting and change their minds completely and that means you've wasted a day. Sometimes one asks oneself 'Isn't it more fun to sit on the beach with an interesting book?'"

Mosley was cutting about F1 team principals and their inability to make decisions and resolve problems -- one unnamed team boss he described as "not the sharpest knife in the box". He said the "interminable discussions about completely irrelevant minutia" obstructed serious work being done and that the situation had "begun to pall".

Asked if he would possibly rethink his decision to resign, Mosley replied: "I am not an F1 team principal so I don't change my mind every few minutes."

However, despite his hard-hitting words, he said he did not regret his 13 years at the helm of the FIA. "Above all you shouldn't stay in a job that is as important as the FIA if it doesn't really fascinate you," he said. "I have achieved in the job everything I have set out to achieve and I'm grateful to the people who have helped me do that."

One of Mosley's last acts as President will be to set the wheels in motion for the reduction of performance in F1, on the grounds of safety, as he outlined at a World Motor Sport Council meeting earlier this week. The Council formally requested that the F1 Technical Working Group (TWG) proposes ideas for performance reduction, otherwise the FIA would enforce its own.

"I've got one final thing I have to do and that is push through the changes to Formula One which I explained (on Wednesday)," Mosley said. "That will be set in motion next Tuesday."

"The speeds are dangerously fast -- we cannot afford to take this risk. It is our duty to act before someone gets seriously hurt or killed. The risks are unacceptably high."

If the TWG cannot decide it's own solutions, Mosley said three alternatives will be presented by the FIA. The TWG will have 45 days to chose one and if no decision is made the FIA will then impose its own measures.

"To help them we will furnish them with a precise set of regulations on three topics -- aerodynamics, engines and tyres -- within the next two weeks," Mosley explained.

"With regard to tyres, we suggest dramatically reducing the number available, with one set for Friday and Saturday and then a second set for qualifying and race, with two types available. The original set could be used as back-up if they found they could not use the second set."

"On engines, we are proposing that in 2005 an engine will need to do two weekends between rebuilds as a means of achieving a slight reduction in power before, in 2006, introducing 2.4-litre V8s with more restrictions -- in terms of dimensions, crank centre lines etc -- than those presented by the manufacturers."

"People will say, well, what about the teams who don't have access to a 2.4-litre V8 because they are not aligned to a manufacturer? We will therefore allow a 3.0-litre V10 to be used, complete with a rev limiter set at a level that ensures that the engine is less powerful than the 2.4s."

In regard to aerodynamics Mosley said there would be a "significant package for 2005", the details of which would be mapped out in the next two weeks. He had originally wanted a single tyre supplier but now thinks the performance reduction can be better achieved by regulations.

In regard to who whould succeed him as FIA President, Mosley said: "At the General Assembly in October where I step down, there will be an election for the vacant post of president. It's any vacancy in the committee or the presidency, any of the offices of the FIA, is filled by election. There will be an election of the entire body and they will decide if there is more than one candidate there will be a vote."

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