FIA vetoes Ferrari's fuel cooling plans

According to reports from Monza, the FIA has now made it clear to Ferrari that it will not permit the Maranello team to use cooled fuel in Formula One. The team had been planning to cool its fuel in order to get a horsepower edge from the lower...

According to reports from Monza, the FIA has now made it clear to Ferrari that it will not permit the Maranello team to use cooled fuel in Formula One.

The team had been planning to cool its fuel in order to get a horsepower edge from the lower combustion temperatures, similar to the concept pioneered by Roger Penske's team on the Trans Am circuit in the early 1970s.

In addition to the edge in power, cooler fuel has a higher density, and, at 4C, it might actually require some 5% less space for the same weight of fuel.

Given that the fuel consumption is, in fact, based on the weight and not volume of fuel, this would, in turn, imply an effective fuel tank capacity increase of some 5%. At a track like Monza, this would likely have increased the available range between fuel stops by some two laps, enabling the team to either have greater flexibility in strategy, or to even run a one-stop race rather than a two-stop one.

Given that the FIA has put a stop to the idea, it appears that the smaller F1 teams can now sigh at least a small breath of relief in not having to acquire fuel cooling equipment as well.

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About this article
Series Formula 1
Drivers Roger Penske
Teams Ferrari