FIA stands firm on engine freeze

The FIA has underlined its intention to go ahead with the engine 'freeze' and President Max Mosley said the time for discussion is over. In France the Grand Prix Manufacturers' Association (GPMA) said it and its teams had agreed on the...

The FIA has underlined its intention to go ahead with the engine 'freeze' and President Max Mosley said the time for discussion is over. In France the Grand Prix Manufacturers' Association (GPMA) said it and its teams had agreed on the 'Indianapolis Proposal' in regard to a partial freeze but shortly afterwards Renault released a statement saying it was not party to that agreement.

The FIA then released its own statement emphasising the need to supply engines to smaller teams, including financial assistance to independent engine manufacturers, and said the GPMA's stance was 'confusing' -- with the upshot that the rules on engine homologation would stay as originally decided.

Now, with apparently no advancements on the Indianapolis Proposal -- reportedly due to the manufacturers balking at the assistance to small teams because it might benefit a company affiliated to a rival manufacturer -- Mosley has written to the 11 teams to tell them that the engine freeze discussion is now over.

"It is clear that we must stop discussing engine regulations and focus entirely on complying with those we already have," he said in the letter, which has been widely circulated in the media. "This means that engines used in 2008 will be those in use on 1 June 2006."

The engine freeze was originally due to come into force in 2008 but Mosley is urging the teams to bring it forward to 2007 in order to prevent expensive development for engines next year that would only be used for a single season.

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Series Formula 1