FIA, FOTA, trade blows via media on Thursday

F1's short period of faux-peace ended dramatically on the eve of the German Grand Prix, and on Thursday the battle via media was back in high gear. After the eight FOTA teams walked out of a FIA meeting on Wednesday, the governing body hit back...

F1's short period of faux-peace ended dramatically on the eve of the German Grand Prix, and on Thursday the battle via media was back in high gear.

After the eight FOTA teams walked out of a FIA meeting on Wednesday, the governing body hit back with a 700-word press document accusing the Geneva based alliance of not telling the truth in its Wednesday release.

In an article posted on the official Ferrari website, meanwhile, the Italian team cherry-picked the media coverage of the resumption of hostilities to issue a strong rebuke of the sport's ageing figureheads Max Mosley and Bernie Ecclestone.

A section of a Daily Mail article described the pair as "gruesome" and "awful men" and said they "can't be removed from public life quickly enough".

The Ferrari piece called the British newspaper "incisive" and the verdict "telling".

The FIA was also in fighting mood, insisting FOTA - and "anyone with an elementary knowledge of motor sport governance" - knows that rules can only be amended with unanimity.

"To suggest that FOTA were only made aware of this during the meetings of yesterday is quite simply untrue," said the Paris body. "So is the implicit claim that they were all unaware of one of motor sport's basic principles."

The FIA also made FOTA's protest of the necessity for unanimity seem foolish by revealing that the five non-FOTA teams actually did confirm the rule changes agreed" on 24 June, raising the question about what the rebel teams are really objecting to.

It seems the problem might be the teams' reluctance to all sign a "legally enforceable contract" pledging to reduce costs to 1990s levels, with the FIA confirming that this document has not yet been enacted.

The FIA also believes FOTA has broken the Paris "deal" by offering not an amended 1998 Concorde Agreement for the FIA to sign, but instead a "completely new" agreement numbering 350 pages.

Nevertheless, the 2009 Concorde will be "ready for signature in the coming days", the FIA added.

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About this article
Series Formula 1
Drivers Bernie Ecclestone
Teams Ferrari