2004 rules announced

TORONTO, ON - The final stage of Canadian Superbike racing's new rules package comes into effect with the start of the 2004 season. With Honda, Kawasaki and Yamaha all unveiling new 1000cc, four-cylinder sport bikes for the new model year a ...

TORONTO, ON - The final stage of Canadian Superbike racing's new rules package comes into effect with the start of the 2004 season.

With Honda, Kawasaki and Yamaha all unveiling new 1000cc, four-cylinder sport bikes for the new model year a standardized set of rules will be put in place for the Parts Canada Superbike Championship.

Rules for Canada's premier motorcycle road racing series were revamped for the 2003 season in an effort to contain costs and improve the competitive balance in the Parts Canada Superbike Championship. As part of the performance restrictions a maximum horsepower limit was introduced.

However, grandfather clauses were provided for the existing Superbikes from Honda and Kawasaki. Honda's RC51 and the Kawasaki ZX-7RR were the two most exotic and expensive motorcycles in the Canadian series. They were allowed to remain in the series for an additional season but were restricted in their use of performance parts.

Now Honda will compete on the Parts Canada Superbike tour with its new CBR1000RR while Kawasaki will have the ZX-10R. Yamaha has made a major update to its YZF-R1, which won the 2003 Parts Canada Superbike title with Pascal Picotte. The only model to carryover from 2003 is Suzuki's GSX-R1000, which was redesigned last year.

"Everybody will now be on a level playing field," said series director Colin Fraser of Professional Motorsport Productions. "We have now closed the door on the old format."

As part of the 2004 Parts Canada Superbike rules update motorcycles in the feature class will be expected to adhere more closely to their stock design. For example, competitors will not be allowed to design and install engine scoops or airboxes to improve airflow to the engine, nor will they be permitted to race with certain aftermarket items like trick swingarms or brakes.

"We're going to deal with the original manufacturer equipment as much as we can," Fraser explained. "Our goal with the new rules was always to reduce costs and make the feature class more accessible to competitors."

The result of the new regulations last season was the closest points battle in Canadian national Superbike history, with Picotte edging Suzuki riders Steve Crevier and Francis Martin to the crown at the final race. Six different riders scored a race victory in the eight Parts Canada Superbike rounds and four separate racers took a turn at the top of the point standings.

With the arrival of new motorcycles from three of the four Japanese manufacturers for the 2004 season, the maximum horsepower in the Parts Canada Superbike class has been raised from 155 to 160 hp as measured on the official series Dynojet Dyno. Minimum weight remains at 360 lbs. when measured on the official series scales after qualifying sessions or race action.

Minor rules changes to the 600 Sport Bike national support classes have also been announced for 2004. In both the Hindle Exhaust Pro 600 Sport Bike and International Motorcycle SUPERSHOW Amateur 600 Sport Bike categories maximum horsepower has been bumped from 112 hp to 115 hp and minimum weight has dropped from 355 lbs. to 350 lbs. The weight limit was reduced due to concerns about the use of ballast on some motorcycles in the class.

-www.cdnsuperbike.com-

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Series CSBK
Drivers Pascal Picotte , Francis Martin , Steve Crevier