Chase Miller preps for debut

Chase Miller Flying In More Ways Than One in 2005 18-Year-Old Prepping for ARCA Debut & Getting Pilots License CANTON, GA (March 15, 2005) -- Flying is a term not only used with aviation, but with Motorsports as well. How many times have you...

Chase Miller Flying In More Ways Than One in 2005
18-Year-Old Prepping for ARCA Debut & Getting Pilots License

CANTON, GA (March 15, 2005) -- Flying is a term not only used with aviation, but with Motorsports as well. How many times have you heard the phrase, "Man, he is flying," at a racetrack? Being fast, or flying on the track, is important for a racecar driver and often times, so is flying an airplane. Young Chase Miller intends to do both this year.

The 18-year-old has signed on for a five-race ARCA program for the 2005 season. It is a great step in his career at such an early age, but starting at age five when Miller took to motorcycle racing through his latest adventures in Super Late Models, the young driver has worked on his own equipment.

Now his Bobby Jones Racing #88 cars are based in North Carolina and he is home in Georgia finishing high school. Most drivers would welcome the point of their careers when they no longer needed to toil over the details of their racecars. Miller isn't one of them.

"I visited up there to work on the cars for a few days," said Miller. "But that's been it. I don't know what to do now. I have always worked on my own cars. I've known the cars that I've raced inside and out. I think that makes me a better driver."

And that's just working on the cars. He also has to balance the fact that he will be racing a lot less this year.

"I'm going pretty much from racing on every weekend between February and November to just doing five races," said Miller. "Every Saturday that I can remember during race season has been spent at the track. That's all that I've ever done, so I'm just that much more anxious to get back into the car now."

To pass the time, Miller has taken up a new hobby -- flying.

"My father and I were sitting around one day and we thought it would be cool to learn to fly," said Miller. "So we went to classes together and right now I'm just a few hours away from my pilot's license. There are a few similarities between the racecars and the plane. You have to be aware of what is around you at all times and you need to pay attention to the gauges. The sensation of speed isn't there in the air, though. If you look down, it feels like you are creeping along even going 140 miles per hour."

The amazing thing about Miller's aeronautic studies is that he only started his classes in October and now he is almost finished.

"I'm a pretty quick learner," Miller said.

That applies to racing as well. Miller joined the Southern All Stars Late Model ranks at age 16 and won multiple features, finished second in points and became the youngest ever Rookie of the Year. He has eyed ARCA for awhile, but couldn't make a speedway start in the series until he turned 18. Miller had his birthday in January, so now it's off to Nashville on March 26th for that series debut. It will be a major event at a big track and will be televised live on Speed Channel.

"I'm very excited about ARCA," said Miller. "I'm ready to go to the next level and compete with these guys. I want to learn the speedways and I want to learn about these cars. I love learning things and understanding them for the first time, so I'm really looking forward to it."

And being the kid at the track does not scare Miller.

"Since I first started racing, I was always the youngest person at the track," said Miller. "It kind of grew on me. Once I get into the car, age doesn't matter and I'm not intimated. I've realized that everyone else is just another car out there."

-51ss-

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About this article
Series ARCA
Drivers Chase Miller